Cornishbluepixie

"We carry more luggage than the porters at King's Cross"

My secret Downton fangirl life

A to Z of Period Drama

I will never bend my knee to the whoremaster of Rome! You can take my son, but I have the means to produce ten more sons and they will hunt you down and send you to your grave! - Caterina Sforza

(via beauchampfraser)

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION → Michelle Dockery
        EMMY SUBMISSION: season four, episode one

"Somehow, with Matthew's death, all the softness that he 
found in me seems to have dried up and drained away. Maybe
it was only ever there in his imagination."

(Source: connietough, via gingerrogerss)

queenwydville:

HISTORY MEME | Captivating Kings + Queens [3/-}
 ♕ Lady Anne Boleyn (1501 - 5/19/1536)

Anne was not popular with the people of England. They were upset to learn that at the Christmas celebrations of 1529, Anne was given precedence over the Duchesses of Norfolk and Suffolk, the latter of which was the King’s own sister, Mary. In this period, records show that Henry began to spend more and more on Anne, buying her clothes, jewelry, and things for her amusement such as playing cards and bows and arrows.

The waiting continued and Anne’s position continued to rise. On the first day of September 1532, she was created Marquess of Pembroke, a title she held in her own right. In October, she held a position of honor at meetings between Henry and the French King in Calais. Sometime near the end of 1532, Anne finally gave way and by December she was pregnant. To avoid any questions of the legitimacy of the child, Henry was forced into action. Sometime near St. Paul’s Day (January 25) 1533, Anne and Henry were secretly married. Although the King’s marriage to Catherine was not dissolved, in the King’s mind it had never existed in the first place, so he was free to marry whomever he wanted. On May 23, the Archbishop officially proclaimed that the marriage of Henry and Catherine was invalid.

Plans for Anne’s coronation began. In preparation, she had been brought by water from Greenwich to the Tower of London dressed in cloth of gold. The barges following her were said to stretch for four miles down the Thames. On the 1st of June, she left the Tower in procession to Westminster Abbey, where she became a crowned and anointed Queen in a ceremony led by Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury. Anne took to her chamber, according to custom, on August 26, 1533 and on September 7, at about 3:00 in the afternoon, the Princess Elizabeth was born. Her christening service was scaled down, but still a pleasant affair. By January of 1534, she was pregnant again, but the child was either miscarried or stillborn. In 1535, she became pregnant again but miscarried by the end of January. The child was reported to have been a boy. The Queen was quite upset, and blamed the miscarriage on her state of mind after hearing that Henry had taken a fall in jousting and his newly found ‘affections’ for Mistress Seymour. 

Anne’s enemies at court began to plot against her using the King’s attentions to Mistress Seymour as the catalyst for action. Cromwell began to move in action to bring down the Queen. He persuaded the King to sign a document calling for an investigation that would possibly result in charges of treason. Interestingly, shortly before her execution on charges of adultery, the Queen’s marriage to the King was dissolved and declared invalid. One would wonder then how she could have committed adultery if she had in fact never been married to the King, but this was overlooked, as were so many other lapses of logic in the charges against Anne.

They came for Anne on the morning of May 19 to take her to the Tower Green, where she was to be afforded the dignity of a private execution. She made a short speech before kneeling on the scaffold. She removed her headdress (which was an English gable hood and not her usual French hood, according to contemporary reports) and her ladies tied a blindfold over her eyes. The sword itself had been hidden under the straw. The swordsman acted with one swift stroke. Her remains were put into an arrow chest and buried in an unmarked grave in the Chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula which adjoined the Tower Green. Her body was one that was identified in renovations of the chapel under the reign of Queen Victoria, so Anne’s final resting place is now marked in the marble floor. {X]

{[inspiration]}

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